INTERNATIONAL PRODUCTION SHOT ON THE RIVIERA PROMISES TO BE THE NEXT BIG TV HIT

Glamour, drame, fourberie…C’est la recette de Riviera,  une production internationale qui devrait être le prochain gros succès télé. Glamour,  drama, double-dealing…That’s the recipe of Riviera, an international production that should be the next big TV hit.

Shot last summer on our shores, Sky Atlantic’s eagerly anticipated drama Riviera got its big debut recently at miptv, in front of players from the TV and digital industry.

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There could not have been a more appropriate setting for the world premiere of Riviera, a new 10-part television series which is all about complex relationships and audacious excesses in the sun drenched luxury of the French Riviera!

Created by Oscar-winning writer and director Neil Jordan (The Borgias, The Crying Game), based on an idea by former U2 manager, Paul McGuiness, and co-written by Booker Prize-winning author John Banville (The Sea), the glamour thriller tells the story of Midwestern girl, Georgina, played by Hollywood star Julia Stiles (Jason Bourne) who was married to billionaire and art collector Constantine Clios, played by Anthony LaPaglia (Lantana), until his demise in a yacht explosion. As she tries to uncover the truth about his death, the heroine slowly comes face to face with the extent of her husband’s questionable business dealings, as well as a world of deceit, depravity, and corruption.

Aside from Stiles and LaPaglia, the international cast also includes some big names like Adrian Lester (London Spy) as Georgina’s friend and art dealer Robert Carver, Lena Olin (Chocolat) as Irina, the first wife of the dead man, and Iwan Rheon (Game of Thrones) and Dimitri Leonidas (The Monument Men) as Constantine’s sons, Adam and Christos.

A murder, a glamorous location, a handful of colourful characters and a great dose of double-dealing, Riviera definitely has all the ingredients to become the next huge TV hit. While there are no fixed dates set for its release, the series is expected to launch in the UK and Ireland in late 2017, while many countries around the world have already bought the broadcasting rights.

 

All images courtesy Sky Atlantic

NADIA FRY HELPS TURN YOUR WEDDING DREAMS INTO REALITY

Entretien avec Nadia Fry pour Riviera Buzz. Interview with Nadia Fry for Riviera Buzz.

Nadia Fry had always dreamed of running her own business, and recently decided to launch her own wedding planning venture.

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Born in Latvia, Nadia Fry has spent many years working in the field of luxury. She recently launched her own wedding planning company, putting her organizational skills and creative vision at the service of couples who have big expectations for their special day.

First of all, can you tell us a little about yourself and your background?

My name is Nadia Fry, I was born in Riga, Latvia (Baltic States). My parents are originally from Ukraine and Kazakhstan. Following studies in Latvia, England, Italy and France, I have worked in different luxury environments. Most recently, I spent seven years in the yachting industry. I am married to an amazing Frenchman, and we have two beautiful children, Jules and Naomi.

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What inspired you to become a wedding planner?

I have always dreamt of running my own business, and a couple of years ago, I felt I was ready for it. To be a wedding planner means putting all my knowledge, experiences, passions, talents together in order to help people live their dreams.

What is your signature style?

I love nature. Even if every wedding is very individual, I prefer bohemian, rustic, and vintage styles. My favourite parts are the floral design and the coordination of the wedding day, when I can use my creativity and foreign language skills.

In your opinion, what are the required qualities to be a good wedding planner?

First of all, you have to be a nice person, very open-minded, able to manage stressful situations, multifunctional, creative, and have good taste.

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What do you find the most challenging about your work?

The biggest challenge is meeting my client’s expectations while respecting their budget and creating the dream they have in mind!

And the most rewarding?

When the couple trust you completely and when they are happy with the organisation of their wedding.

Have you already noticed any hot wedding trends for the upcoming year?

More and more people like natural styles, where you can see a lot of green decoration with eucalyptus, olive, rosemary branches. White is still used a lot, but often it is mixed with bright colours, like purple, blue, pink, and so on. Natural materials are used for the decoration, like wood, linen and stones. Simple things.

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What advice would you give to couples who are in the midst of planning their special day? How involved should they be in the whole process?

It is very individual, actually. People think that a wedding planner is an additional cost, but the reality is that thanks to a wedding planner the couple can save time and money, because wedding planners are in contact with the best suppliers and can benefit from the best rates. Some couples give free rein to the wedding planner, some other only delegate one part of the organisation. Well, the best thing to do in any case is to choose a person / wedding planner that you trust.

Your company organizes weddings in the south of France and the south of Italy. As for you, do you have one favorite spot in particular?

Well, there are so many magic places and it is not easy to pick.

In the South of Italy, I prefer Villa Scarpariello, an historic castle built on a sea cliff. This noble and enchanting aristocratic residence is situated in Marmorata di Ravello, one of the most exclusive and panoramic towns on the Amalfi Coast.

In the South of France, I would recommend getting married in the charming little villages of the Mercantour, like Saint-Martin Vésubie. Only an hour from the airport, you find the most beautiful and preserved natural grounds in the beautiful mountains with a true warm hospitality. This was my personal choice when I got married four years ago…

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Finally, what do you like about the French Riviera?

It is an amazing place! For me, it is magical to sit on the beach and see the mountains capped with snow. Italy is very close. Every town by the sea has its own charm and style. The little villages around are talking history and it seems that you are in a different reality.

Many thanks to Nadia for taking the time to talk to us. To find out more about Nadia’s work, be sure to visit her website

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All photos courtesy Nadia Fry

GRACE KELLY – THE MAGICAL YEARS

Quelques mois après son expo consacrée à Jackie Kennedy, la Galerie Ferrero à Nice salut la mémoire de Grace Kelly. A few months after his exhibit dedicated to Jackie Kennedy, the Galerie Ferrero in Nice pays tribute to Grace Kelly.

The wedding of Oscar winning-actress Grace Kelly and Prince Rainier of Monaco remains a fairy tale story that still fascinates people the world over.

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When it comes to iconic figures, few women can compare with Grace Kelly. Just a few months after celebrating another fascinating personality, Jackie Kennedy, Galerie Ferrero in Nice has decided to relive the timeless magic of this love story, as well as the following decade that saw the movie queen blossoming into a real European princess.

Not surprisingly, the exhibit ‘Grace Princesse de Monaco’ starts with pictures of the actress on the set of “To Catch a Thief”, the Alfred Hitchcock movie that brought her to the French Riviera for the first time.

It follows on with the photo shoot for an editorial feature organized by Paris Match in 1955 between the American beauty and the Prince of Monaco. Grace, who was only 26 years old at the time, was attending the Cannes Film Festival while the Monegasque royal, at nearly 32, was one of Europe’s most eligible bachelors. Dressed in a beautiful floral dress, we see her wandering through the palace’s gardens and small zoo as she is falling in love with her prince.

Less than a year later, the whirlwind romance led to a beautiful religious ceremony, held at the cathedral in Monaco on the 18th of April, 1956. In front of 600 guests, the American actress became Her Serene Highness, Princess Grace of Monaco, and that was the beginning of what seemed to be for most onlookers an enchanted life on a little hilltop overlooking the Mediterranean Sea.

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Through more photographs and official portraits, as well as a few personal artefacts, family memorabilia and movie posters, the exhibit goes on to explore both Grace’s public and private lives. It immerses the visitor in the years that followed the exchange of vows, the birth of their three children, and the new royals first steps into high society. The exhibition ends in the late 1960’s, with the movie star-turned-princess just celebrating her 40th birthday, having achieved the status of beacon of beauty, style and sophistication, a status that she still holds today, more than 30 years after her death.

Grace Princesse de Monaco’ runs until the 31st of August at Galerie Ferrero in Nice, and admission is €5 (€2 for students). Opening hours are Monday to Thursday from 2pm to 7pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 12pm and from 2pm to 7pm.

CONTACT DETAILS
Galerie Ferrero
6, rue du Congrès
06000 Nice

Tel: + 33 4 93 88 34 44

 

RUN’BOW COLORS™ COMES TO THE FRENCH RIVIERA

Le mois d’avril devrait être coloré sur la Côte d’Azur. The month of April should be colorful on the french Riviera.

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Colour runs are all the rage at the moment the world over, and La Métropole Nice Côte d’Azur welcomes one of these “happiest 5Ks on earth”.

After the first run in the south of France last October in Aix-en-Provence, the spotlight is now on Saint Laurent du Var, which hosts the first Run’Bow Colors™, to be held in early April. The run promotes fitness and good times in a friendly and non-competitive atmosphere for all participants.

Inspired by India’s Holi festival during which celebrants signify the death of winter and rebirth of spring by throwing coloured powder at each other, the event is a unique 5k that has already taken the U.S. by storm, and is now invading Europe. The first French edition was organized in 2014 in Paris and attracted about 13,000 runners, as well as one in Marseilles five months later.

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The race is only intended as pure fun – the goal is not to run fast or to challenge oneself but just to complete a 5km course while being plastered with non-toxic and non-allergic powdered paint (made of 100% natural food-grade cornstarch) in every colour of the rainbow.

Pretty much anyone can take part in the event, old and young, sport aficionados and first-time runners; the only requirement being for all participants to wear white clothing! Once the race starts, then it becomes a real colour fest: After the first kilometre, runners are doused in blue, after the second red, and so on, until the finish line when they are covered head-to-toe in every imaginable hue.

And if after all that, you feel that there is still something missing, then let the official DJs of the Run’Bow Colors™ carry you away on a wave of sound to wrap up this festive occasion.

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Run’Bow Colors™ takes place on Sunday 3rd of April at 2pm in Saint-Laurent du Var

 

All images courtesy Run’Bow Colors™

LA PAUSA IN CAP-MARTIN ACQUIRED BY HOUSE OF CHANEL

Premier article de l’année pour Riviera Buzz. first article of the year for Riviera Buzz.

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A splendid villa overlooking both the Mediterranean and Cap-Martin, uninhabited since 2007, and recently acquired by the House of Chanel.

88 years after one Gabrielle « Coco » Chanel purchased the land to built her dream vacation home, La Pausa, the House of Chanel has acquired the property and after renovation work to restore the villa to its original spirit, the famed fashion house is planning to dedicate the place to the brand and its values. The villa is the only of her houses that Mademoiselle had specially designed, built and decorated for her.

 

Chanel fell in love with the French Riviera during the 1920s while vacationing in the company of the Duke of Westminster with whom she had a long affair. Together, they commissioned architect Robert Streitz to build a villa in their image and likeness. So, while the duke’s bedroom was somber, Coco Chanel’s suite was full of colour, decorated with a pink canopy, mirrors and chandeliers. It was furnished in a simple and modern way and had many references to the the architecture of Aubazine, the former abbey transformed into an orphanage where Chanel spent a large part of her adolescence.

In La Pausa the couple would welcome some of the biggest artists of the time such as Jean Cocteau, Serge Lifar, Salvador Dali, Pierre Bonnard and Winston Churchill.

In 1954, following the Duke of Westminster’s death, Mademoiselle sold the villa fully furnished to Emery Reves, an American writer and publisher, who kept much of the decor in its original condition but brought a new burst of life back to the residence inviting friends such as Greta Garbo and Jackie Onassis.

The villa has however always held an important place in the fashion designer’s life and one of the perfumes of the collection Les Exclusifs is even called 28 La Pausa, with is not only a reference to this special place, but also to the year in which its story began.

 

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Lead image The Great Hall of La Pausa (as reconstructed at the Dallas Museum of Art) By Photo: User:FA2010Own work, Public Domain; image of La Pausa perfume courtesy Chanel website

 

Nice to Pay Tribute to the Amazing Work of Charlotte Salomon

Dernier article en date pour Riviera Buzz sur l’incroyable exposition des œuvres de Charlotte Salomon en février prochain à Nice. Latest article to date for Riviera Buzz about the the incredible exhibit of Charlotte Salomon’s work this coming February in Nice.

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All throughout 2016, the city of Nice will commemorate the dark years of World War II (1940-1944) with a wide and varied programme.

Included in the commemorations are ceremonies, tributes, meetings with personalities such as Serge Klarsfeld, as well as an incredible exhibit of no less than 300 pieces from Charlotte Salomon’s compelling artwork, Life? Or Theater? An Operetta. This will be a unique occasion to discover, or rediscover, the tragic tale of this young German artist who created her masterpiece right here on the French Riviera, while living as a refugee from Nazism.

Structured like a play and comprised of various scenes, dialogues and musical references, this massive work is a testament to Salomon’s unique artistic vision but also to her life, which started on the 16th of April, 1917 in Berlin. Born to Albert Salomon, a surgeon, and Fränze Grunwald, she was, despite her dad’s reluctance, named after her deceased aunt. When she was only nine, Charlotte’s mother committed suicide but in order to protect her from her maternal family’s terrible secret, the little girl was told she had died of influenza.

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After the Nazis came to power in 1933, the young Charlotte had to drop out from school. She still managed however to get admitted to the prestigious State Art Academy in Berlin a few years later, which only allowed 1.5% of Jews. This is during that time that she met and fell in love with Alfred Wolfson, a Jewish musician twice her age, who became the first person to believe in her. But then came Kristallnacht in 1938 and Charlotte was sent to live with her maternal grandparents who had found refuge in l’Ermitage, a beautiful villa located in Villefranche, at the invitation of Ottilie Moore, a wealthy American of German origin.

The reprieve did not last long. Soon after she arrived, her grandmother committed suicide in 1940 and Charlotte finally learned the awful truth that had long been kept from her, that is that eight other members of her family, including her mother and aunt, had taken their own lives. Terribly distraught and convinced she would be next, the young woman then decided to break the vicious circle and “to paint her life rather than to take it.” To do so, she moved to Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat , and started working on her masterpiece in the gardens of the Hôtel Belle Aurore, overlooking the Mediterranean. In the space of two years, the young artist produced more than 1,370 notebook-size gouache paintings – only 795 were kept for the final version – with the bright colours used to recount her early life, darkening as the story moved along. To coordinate the various drawings, she included dialogues, at times witty, ironic or sad, to introduce the characters, scenes and situations, as well as some music, both classical (Schubert, Bizet…) and popular (famous German songs), anthems and even prayers. The project was finished in 1942 and if it may have been intended as a diary, the final result is first and foremost a spectacular and deeply moving piece of art.

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In one of the latest captions accompanying her paintings, Charlotte wrote “I will live my life for them all.” She unfortunately never had the time. In September 1943, the Italians, who until then had occupied the south of France, surrendered and the Germans moved into Nice. Soon thereafter, Nazi war criminal Alois Brunner, a top aide to Adolf Eichmann, started organizing some of the war’s most violent raids and on September 24, 1943, Charlotte and her husband were arrested in Villefranche. Deported to Auschwitz, Charlotte who was four-month pregnant, was immediately sent to her death.

Her short legacy however did survive. Probably feeling she was in danger, Charlotte had indeed managed to entrust her work with her physician and friend, Dr. Moridis of Villefranche “Keep this safe. It is my whole life,” shortly after finishing it. Dedicated to Ottilie Moore, it was donated to the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam by Charlotte’s father and stepmother after the war.

This museum is now lending all the pieces of art that will be on display from the 5th of February to the 24th of May at Musée Masséna. The vernissage will take place on the 4th of February at 7pm in the presence of Mayor Christian Estrosi and popular author David Foenkinos who recounted in 2014 the real life story of the painter in his book Charlotte.

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CONTACT DETAILS
Charlotte Salomon Vie ? ou Théâtre ?
Musée Masséna
65, rue de France
06200 Nice

Open every day except Tuesday from 10 am to 9 pm

 

Lead image “Charlotte Salomon painting in the garden about 1939” by UnknownMuseum page. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons; “Charlotte Salomon – JHM 4762 -Kristallnacht” by Charlotte SalomonMuseum page. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons; “Charlotte Salomon – JHM 4351” by Charlotte SalomonMuseum page. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons; photo of Musée Masséna courtesy Ville de Nice

 

LA FÊTE DE LA TRANSHUMANCE IN ROUBION, WHERE THE SHEEP IS KING

Récit dans riviera Buzz d’un dimanche ensoleillé à Rubion pour la Transhumance. Story in Riviera Buzz of a sunny Sunday in Rubion for the “Transhumance”.

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Every autumn, thousands of sheep leave behind the upland pastures where they spent a peaceful summer to find shelter in the low-lands.

And every year, this procession gives rise to the traditional Fête de la Transhumance in the village of Roubion, a perched village located on the descent from the Col de la Couillole.

Last Sunday, just a few hours after torrential rains transformed most of the French Riviera into a terrifying flood zone, the sun was back and people turned out in large number to cheer on the farmers, their dogs and their adorable woolly quadrupeds as they passed through the 12th century old village on their way to the Var.

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The festivities started at 8:30 am with the baking of bread, some traditional dancing and a craft market. Then it was time for everybody to gather on the main square to welcome the colourful and noisy procession (the sheep wore tags and the few goats that accompanied them tinkling collars) in a friendly atmosphere.

A bit behind schedule, the animals finally arrived around 11:45 am to the applause of the waiting crowd. If today most flocks are moved by large double-decker trucks, this annual celebration offers a unique opportunity to witness the sheep being herded down the small roads and to walk with them from the village to the station of Roubion Les Buisses, just a couple of kilometers away, to the sound of traditional Provençal music.

The hike is easy and takes about half an hour but for those who cannot walk, free shuttles are also available.

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Once in the station, the sheep continued grazing on the lush green pasture but the festivities did not end for the bipeds. Many stalls offered delicious food (cheese, sausages, ham, socca…), home-made jams and local wines, while a small farm provided for some great entertainment.

Roubion has been hosting this annual transhumance fête since 2003 and this year’s celebration once again offered a breath of fresh air – a nice parenthesis in a somewhat difficult weekend on the Côte d’Azur.

THROUGHOUT THE WEEKEND, THE FRENCH RIVIERA MARCHED FOR CHARLIE

“Je ne suis pas d’accord avec ce que vous dites, mais je me battrai pour que vous ayez le droit de le dire” (Voltaire).”I do not agree with what you say, but I will fight to the death to defend your right to say it.”(Voltaire)

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Just a few days after the terrorist attacks that claimed the lives of 17 people in the space of three days, thousands of people all over the French Riviera took to the streets to honour the victims and support free speech. Just like in Paris where on Sunday many world leaders joined about 1.5 million French citizens in an unprecedented “national unity”rally, people marched silently and peacefully on Saturday morning in Nice, holding the national flag, big pens, posters or buttons with the now world-famous slogan “Je Suis Charlie”.

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Local police said that about 25,000 participated in the march but other estimates put that figure at over 30,000. One thing is for sure, the Azurean capital had not seen a manifestation of that scale since the end of Word War II. At the same time, there were 3,000 people on the place des Martyrs de la Résistance in Antibes while on Sunday morning, more than 10,000 people gathered in Menton and Cannes.

France has a long tradition of street demonstrations, but this time people just wanted to stand up and showed up an united front against intolerance and racism. There were Jews, Muslims, Catholics and atheists, liberals, conservatives and socialists. Some were not even big fans of the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo and its often controversial cartoons. But this weekend, their origins and political opinions did not matter. They just wanted to show that it was possible for all communities to live together in France and to defend all the values of the Republic, including the freedom of expression.

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LIFE ON THE FRENCH RIVIERA THROUGH THE CAMERA LENS

Dernier article en date pour Riviera Buzz. (Latest article to date for Riviera Buzz)

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The Riviera Camera Club is holding an exhibition of the works of its members throughout the holiday season in Villefranche-sur-Mer.

Their names are Lorraine, Linda, Rositsa, Kate, Lisa, Gira and Kathryn. They came to the French Riviera for their studies, a job opportunity or sometimes just by accident and they fell in love with the region for its gentle year-round climate, its Mediterranean location or its vibrant colours. But no matter what their initial reasons were for choosing the south of France, the seven members of the Riviera Camera Club now get to share their unique vision of their adoptive home with everyone, locals and expats alike, during a photo exhibit that is being held at the Welcome Hotel in Villefranche-sur-Mer this holiday season.

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For the last few years, under the guidance of their teacher, Rebecca Marshall, those amateur photographers have wandered through the region with camera in hand, in search of the perfect photo opportunity. As one of them,Lorraine Davidson, puts it: “the light here makes our surroundings look different from one day to the next. I completely understand why people are drawn to this part of the world.

And from little villages and vineyards to lavender fields and national parks, they have captured little moments from their every day life on the coast and put into images their own perception of the Côte d’Azur.

The exhibition Mediterranean Moments : Pespectives on the French Riviera is being held every day until the 4th of January. If you cannot make it to Villefranche-sur-Mer, you can always check the images online.

If you would like to become a member of the Riviera Camera Club, you can contact Rebecca Marshall via herwebsite. You can also get information on upcoming classes here, as well as the opportunity to view samples of her work as a professional photographer for The New York Times and Der Spiegel, among many other outlets.

CONTACT DETAILS
Hotel Welcome
3, quai de l’Admiral Courbet
06230 Villefranche-sur-Mer

All images courtesy Riviera Camera Club; lead image All About Jack © Lisa Peck;

REMEMBERING CHARLOTTE SALOMON AND HER LIFE ON THE FRENCH RIVIERA

Dernier article en date pour Riviera Buzz. (Latest article to date for Riviera Buzz).

Charlotte Salomon

German artist Charlotte Salomon created her greatest work whilst living on the French Riviera, before being deported to her death in Auschwitz.

Last Wednesday, popular author David Foenkinos was awarded the Renaudot, probably France’s most prestigious literary prize after the Goncourt, for his latest book, Charlotte, which recounts the real life story of painter Charlotte Salomon. A perfect occasion to discover, or rediscover, the tragic tale of this young German artist who created her original and compelling artwork, Life? Or Theater? An Operetta, right here on the French Riviera, while living as a refugee from Nazism.

Structured like a play and comprising various scenes, dialogues and musical references, this massive work is a testament to Salomon’s unique artistic vision but also to her life, which started on the 16th of April, 1917 in Berlin. Born to Albert Salomon, a surgeon, and Fränze Grunwald, she was, despite her father’s reluctance, named after her deceased aunt. When she was only nine, Charlotte’s mother committed suicide — in order to protect her from her maternal family’s terrible secret, the little girl was told that she had died of influenza.

After the Nazis came to power in 1933, the young Charlotte had to drop out from school. She still managed however to get admitted a few years later to the prestigious State Art Academy in Berlin which only allowed 1.5% of Jews. This is during that time that she met and fell in love with Alfred Wolfson, a Jewish musician twice her age, who became the first person to believe in her. But then came the Kristallnacht in 1938, and Charlotte was sent to live with her maternal grandparents who had found refuge in a beautiful villa, l’Ermitage located in Villefranche, at the invitation of Ottilie Moore, a wealthy American of German origin.

The reprieve did not last long. Soon after she arrived, her grandmother committed suicide in 1940 and Charlottefinally learned the awful truth that had long been hidden from her, that eight other members of her family, including her mother and aunt, had also taken their own lives. Terribly distraught and convinced she would be next, the young woman then decided to break the vicious circle and “to paint her life rather than to take it.” To do so, she moved to Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat and in the gardens of the Hôtel Belle Aurore, overlooking the Mediterranean, she started working on her masterpiece. In the space of two years, the young artist produced more than 1,370 notebook-size gouache paintings – only 795 were kept for the final version – with bright colours used to recount her early life, gradually darkening as the story moved along. To coordinate the various drawings, she included dialogues, at timeswitty, ironic or sad, to introduce the characters, scenes and situations, as well as some music, both classical (Schubert, Bizet…) and popular (famous German songs), anthems and even prayers. The project was finished in 1942 and if it may have been intended as a diary, the final result is first and foremost a spectacular and deeply moving piece of art.

In one of the latest captions accompanying her paintings, Charlotte wrote “I will live my life for them all.” She unfortunately never had the time. In September 1943, the Italians, who until then had occupied the south of France, surrendered and the Germans moved into Nice. Soon thereafter, Nazi war criminal Alois Brunner, a top aide to Adolf Eichmann, started organizing some of the war’s most violent raids and on September 24th, 1943, Charlotte and her husband were arrested in Villefranche. Deported to Auschwitz, Charlotte who was four-months pregnant, was immediately sent to her death.

Her short legacy however did survive. Probably feeling that she was in danger, Charlotte had managed to entrust her work to her physician and friend, Dr. Moridis of Villefranche. “Keep this safe. It is my whole life,” shortly after finishing it. Dedicated to Ottilie Moore, it was donated to the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam by Charlotte’s father and stepmother after the war.

Lead image Charlotte S“ von Charlotte Salomon – Museum page. Lizenziert unter Public domain über Wikimedia Commons