WILLIAM KLEIN – TOAST OF THE FRENCH RIVIERA THIS SUMMER

Les villes de Moscou, Tokyo et Nice sont les stars de la nouvelle exposition organisée cet été par le Musée de la Photographie Charles Nègre.  Moscow, Tokyo and Nice are the stars of the new exhibition organised this summer by the Musée de la Photographie Charles Nègre.

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For the public at large, he may not be as famous as the likes of Cartier-Bresson or Robert Capa, yet for his peers, photographer and filmmaker William Klein is nothing short of a living legend, having revolutionized the art of modern photography.

Now, the Niçois have a chance to admire the works of an artist who has been capturing the rough and tumble of daily life for more than 60 years, thanks to the exhibit, Bises de Nice, Moscou et Tokyo, that is currently being held at the Musée de la Photographie Charles Nègre until the 2nd of October.

Born in New York in 1928 to a Jewish family, Klein was introduced to Europe while doing his military service. After his demobilization, he stayed in Paris to take classes at La Sorbone and to study art with Fernand Léger. He started taking pictures of the people and street fashion around the French capital, using strong contrasts and blurred contours to produce brutally honest images that stood in direct contradiction to the aesthetical and technically perfect photographs of the times.

 

Strongly interested in social issues, this “anti-photographer” as he likes to call himself became famous in 1956 with the publication of his first book, “Life is Good and Good for You in New York: Trance Witness Revels which showed the Big Apple bas a booming and vibrant city, but also as a harsh and oppressive metropolis.

This was the beginning of a string of expressive portraits of cities. After Rome in 1958, he went to Moscow between 1959 and 1961 at the height of the Cold War, where he was able to go largely unnoticed to paint a picture of a lively, thriving Moscow at odds with the much greyer image the West liked to portray.

William Klein expo NiceThen it was Tokyo in the early 1960’s, where Klein managed to capture the great mutation of a city that was still teetering between tradition and modernity.

While most of his pictures are black and white prints, the artist also occasionally adds a touch of colour to celebrate life, as was the case when he photographed the Nice carnival in 1984, its centenary year.

But Klein is not just a photographer, he is also a filmmaker and the audience can watch his 2005 movie Messiah, which includes performances of Handel’s oratorio by a gay and lesbian gospel choir, as well as inmates of the Sugarland Prison in Texas, over images of contemporary life.

Throughout his career, William Klein has received many distinctions like the Prix Nadar (1957) and the rank of Commandeur des Arts et des Lettres de France (1991), but he remains first and foremost an unconventional artist who likes to take risks and experiment with lots of genres. As he once said: “Sometimes, I’d take shots without aiming to see what happened. I’d rush into crowds—bang!bang!…It must be close to what a fighter feels after jabbing and circling and getting hit, when suddenly there’s an opening, and bang! Right on the button. It’s a fantastic feeling.”

The exhibition, “William Klein: Bises de Nice, Moscou et Tokyo”, runs until 2nd of October, 2017 at the Théâtre de la Photographie et de l’Image, from 10am – 6pm daily (closed Mondays). Admission is free for residents of Nice.

CONTACT DETAILS
Musée de la Photographie Charles Nègre
1, place Pierre Gautier
06300 Nice

Tel: +33 (0)4 97 13 42 20

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BONNARD AND VUILLARD REUNITED IN LE CANNET THIS SUMMER

L’expo de l’été à ne pas manquer au Cannet. The not-to-be missed summer exhibition in Le Cannet!

Pierre Bonnard would have turned 150 this year, and the museum that bears his name in Le Cannet is celebrating this milestone with a special summer-long exhibition.

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This exhibition, ‘BONNARD/VUILLARD La collection Zeïneb et Jean-Pierre Marcie-Rivière’,is centered around masterpieces on loan from the Musée d’Orsay. In total, 25 of Bonnard’s paintings and 94 of his drawings, as well as 24 paintings, 3 pastels and 2 drawings by Édouard Vuillard, taken from the collection of Zeïneb and Jean-Pierre Marcie-Rivière that was generously donated to the Parisian museum, are on display, showing the friendship and close artistic bond that existed between the two artists at the time of the Nabi Movement.

The two met at the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and remained friends until the death of Vuillard in 1940, which devastated Bonnard. As Vuillard wrote in his last letter to his friend on the 4th May of that year: “If I wrote to you every time I think about you, our past, painting, etc., you would have enough letters to fill a library”.

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Throughout the years, they shared their discoveries and experimentations, but also friends and exhibitions. In the 1890’s, they had both taken an interest in the same subjects, with a preference for intimate scenes representing their daily surroundings, with furniture and accessories playing the most important role. They also both adopted a very similar, evocative style, favouring small formats, mysterious compositions, and images from the avant-garde symbolist theatre and the music of Wagner.

The exhibition clearly demonstrates the affinities between the two men and the similarities in their artistic approach, by creating a link between the various artworks. But it also shows their differences. For instance, where Bonnard’s radiant nudes were usually bathed in light, Vuillard, who observed his models from a distance in the privacy of their homes, preferred instead to represent them as ghost-like figures.

The exhibit, “BONNARD/VUILLARD La collection Zeïneb et Jean-Pierre Marcie-Rivière” runs until the 17th of September at the Musée Bonnard in Le Cannet.

CONTACT DETAILS
Musée Bonnard
16, boulevard Sadi Carnot
06110 Le Cannet

Tel: +33 4 93 94 06 06

Open from Tuesday to Sunday, 10am to 6pm

KENSINGTON PALACE PAYS TRIBUTE TO ULTIMATE STYLE ICON THAT WAS PRINCESS DIANA

Une expo qui vaut le détour si vous êtes à Londres. An exhibition that is worth a detour if you are in London.

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One of the most photographed women in the world, she inspired millions of women and designers the world over with her impeccable red carpet looks.

Now, nearly 20 years since her death in Paris in a car accident (on the 31st of August, 1997), Princess Diana is being celebrated as the fashion icon she was in a beautiful exhibition held in the place she called home for over 15 years, Kensington Palace. A great occasion to witness the late Royal’s evolution from a shy debutante with a country girl style to a daring fashionista who communicated through her clothes.

The exhibitionDiana: Her Fashion Story” starts with the Emanuel pale pink chiffon blouse she wore during her first official portrait in 1981 captured by Lord Snowdon and follows with the Bill Pashley brown tweet suit the princess famously wore on her honeymoon in Balmoral in 1981. As time went by, Diana clearly grew more confident, even making comments on the sketches that were sent to her for approval, and in the latter years of her life, thanks in part to her supermodel figure that made any dress she wore look fantastic, it was obvious that Diana no longer followed trends but instead set them. From the sleeveless above the knee outfit she wore to a Christies Auction Gala in New York in 1997, to the green silk velvet evening gown with diamond buttons she wore for a 1997 Vanity Fair photo shoot by Mario Testino, both dresses Catherine Walker creations, she was by then in full control of her image and definitely helped put British fashion designers on the map.

The 25 dresses on display have been lent back by private owners who had acquired them during the famous aforementioned auction where the princess put 79 of her gowns up for auction for charity.

This exhibition is just one of the many events that are going to be organized this year to commemorate the life of Princess Diana. Already, some 12,000 of her favourite flowers, including narcissi, tulips and roses, have recently burst into life thanks to the early spring weather. Created by the gardeners at Kensington Palace, this temporary White Garden was inspired by Diana’s white “Elvis” Catherine Walker dress that is on display, and also includes a few touches of colour in tribute to the Princess’s sense of fun and spirit.

CONTACT DETAILS
Kensington Palace
Kensington Gardens
London W8 4PX
United Kingdom

HENRI CARTIER-BRESSON EXHIBIT IN NICE CHRONICLES THE 20TH CENTURY

Dernier article en date pour Riviera Buzz sur l’exposition Henri Cartier-Bresson à Nice. Latest article to date for Riviera buzz about the Henri Cartier-Bresson exhibition in Nice.

The Henri Cartier-Bresson exhibition currently underway in Nice pays tribute to one of the most influential figures in the history of photography.

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Considered to be the father of photojournalism and dubbed “the eye of the century,” Henri Cartier-Bresson was not only able to capture moments of everyday life with his camera like an ordinary family enjoying a picnic on the banks of the River Marne, he also travelled the world for more than half a century shooting major historic moments. He was present during the Spanish war, the liberation of Paris, the coronation of George VI, the Soviet Union after Stalin’s death and the United States during the postwar boom.

Being so well-travelled and having witnessed most of the of events that shaped the 20th century, Cartier-Bresson also seemed to know everybody. Among the 120 black and white pictures on display, portraits of Henri Matisse, Alberto Giacometti, Pierre Bonnard, Jean-Paul Sartre, Truman Capote or William Faulkner underline the diversity of his images, which are both candid and formal. Throughout his career, the photographer believed in “the decisive moment”, which consisted of him finding an interesting scenario and waiting until all the external elements fell perfectly into place.

Following the Second World War, which he spent mostly as a prisoner of war in German camps, he co-founded the Magnum photo agency with Robert Capa and David Seymour. The agency enabled photojournalists to reach a broad audience through magazines such as Life while retaining control over their work.

In the last 25 years of his life, Cartier-Bresson largely turned away from photography to embrace his first love, painting, but his work was still being exhibited and kept on inspiring many around the globe.

To take photographs means to recognise simultaneously and within a fraction of a second both the fact itself and the rigorous organisation of visually perceived forms that give it meaning. It is putting one’s head, one’s eye and one’s heart on the same axis”, Cartier-Bresson once said. Thanks to this exhibition in Nice, it is obvious that he truly was the eye and the memory of the last century

The Henri Cartier-Bresson runs until 24th January, 2016 at the Théâtre de la Photographie et de l’Image in Nice. It is open every day except Monday from 10am to 6pm. Admission is 10€ but free for Nice residents. 

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CONTACT DETAILS
Théâtre de la Photographie et de l’Image
27, Boulevard Dubouchage
06000 Nice

Tel: 04 97 13 42 20