KENSINGTON PALACE PAYS TRIBUTE TO ULTIMATE STYLE ICON THAT WAS PRINCESS DIANA

Une expo qui vaut le détour si vous êtes à Londres. An exhibition that is worth a detour if you are in London.

IMG_0195.jpg

One of the most photographed women in the world, she inspired millions of women and designers the world over with her impeccable red carpet looks.

Now, nearly 20 years since her death in Paris in a car accident (on the 31st of August, 1997), Princess Diana is being celebrated as the fashion icon she was in a beautiful exhibition held in the place she called home for over 15 years, Kensington Palace. A great occasion to witness the late Royal’s evolution from a shy debutante with a country girl style to a daring fashionista who communicated through her clothes.

The exhibitionDiana: Her Fashion Story” starts with the Emanuel pale pink chiffon blouse she wore during her first official portrait in 1981 captured by Lord Snowdon and follows with the Bill Pashley brown tweet suit the princess famously wore on her honeymoon in Balmoral in 1981. As time went by, Diana clearly grew more confident, even making comments on the sketches that were sent to her for approval, and in the latter years of her life, thanks in part to her supermodel figure that made any dress she wore look fantastic, it was obvious that Diana no longer followed trends but instead set them. From the sleeveless above the knee outfit she wore to a Christies Auction Gala in New York in 1997, to the green silk velvet evening gown with diamond buttons she wore for a 1997 Vanity Fair photo shoot by Mario Testino, both dresses Catherine Walker creations, she was by then in full control of her image and definitely helped put British fashion designers on the map.

The 25 dresses on display have been lent back by private owners who had acquired them during the famous aforementioned auction where the princess put 79 of her gowns up for auction for charity.

This exhibition is just one of the many events that are going to be organized this year to commemorate the life of Princess Diana. Already, some 12,000 of her favourite flowers, including narcissi, tulips and roses, have recently burst into life thanks to the early spring weather. Created by the gardeners at Kensington Palace, this temporary White Garden was inspired by Diana’s white “Elvis” Catherine Walker dress that is on display, and also includes a few touches of colour in tribute to the Princess’s sense of fun and spirit.

CONTACT DETAILS
Kensington Palace
Kensington Gardens
London W8 4PX
United Kingdom

HENRI CARTIER-BRESSON EXHIBIT IN NICE CHRONICLES THE 20TH CENTURY

Dernier article en date pour Riviera Buzz sur l’exposition Henri Cartier-Bresson à Nice. Latest article to date for Riviera buzz about the Henri Cartier-Bresson exhibition in Nice.

The Henri Cartier-Bresson exhibition currently underway in Nice pays tribute to one of the most influential figures in the history of photography.

henri-cartier-bresson-poster

Considered to be the father of photojournalism and dubbed “the eye of the century,” Henri Cartier-Bresson was not only able to capture moments of everyday life with his camera like an ordinary family enjoying a picnic on the banks of the River Marne, he also travelled the world for more than half a century shooting major historic moments. He was present during the Spanish war, the liberation of Paris, the coronation of George VI, the Soviet Union after Stalin’s death and the United States during the postwar boom.

Being so well-travelled and having witnessed most of the of events that shaped the 20th century, Cartier-Bresson also seemed to know everybody. Among the 120 black and white pictures on display, portraits of Henri Matisse, Alberto Giacometti, Pierre Bonnard, Jean-Paul Sartre, Truman Capote or William Faulkner underline the diversity of his images, which are both candid and formal. Throughout his career, the photographer believed in “the decisive moment”, which consisted of him finding an interesting scenario and waiting until all the external elements fell perfectly into place.

Following the Second World War, which he spent mostly as a prisoner of war in German camps, he co-founded the Magnum photo agency with Robert Capa and David Seymour. The agency enabled photojournalists to reach a broad audience through magazines such as Life while retaining control over their work.

In the last 25 years of his life, Cartier-Bresson largely turned away from photography to embrace his first love, painting, but his work was still being exhibited and kept on inspiring many around the globe.

To take photographs means to recognise simultaneously and within a fraction of a second both the fact itself and the rigorous organisation of visually perceived forms that give it meaning. It is putting one’s head, one’s eye and one’s heart on the same axis”, Cartier-Bresson once said. Thanks to this exhibition in Nice, it is obvious that he truly was the eye and the memory of the last century

The Henri Cartier-Bresson runs until 24th January, 2016 at the Théâtre de la Photographie et de l’Image in Nice. It is open every day except Monday from 10am to 6pm. Admission is 10€ but free for Nice residents. 

Henri cartier Bresson

CONTACT DETAILS
Théâtre de la Photographie et de l’Image
27, Boulevard Dubouchage
06000 Nice

Tel: 04 97 13 42 20